The Write to Roam

The Personal Blog of Ethan Brooks

On Life’s Big Fucking Hills

Adventure starts at the place where your plans end. Sometimes, you set out with the goal of having an adventure, and so you purposefully avoid planning. Nothing more than a blank spot on the calendar, a sacked lunch, and an inkling to wander in one direction or another. Other times you’re thrust into adventure when you take a wrong turn, or the power goes out, or any of a thousand other things happen that shake you from the fragile web of your own carefully laid plans. This is more commonly known as misadventure.

Of the two, I tend to find the latter more enjoyable.

For nearly six months I had been traveling in Europe, doing work-trades in exchange for hot meals and a roof over my head. It wasn’t a bad way to live. Staying with local families felt authentic, and I’d lucked into some pretty posh digs. One house had two kitchens, and bedrooms overlooking the sea. Another had a walled garden with its own heated indoor pool. I was living like a millionaire without spending a dime.

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On Small Deaths and the Need for Adventure

Why do we go away? This is the question that every adventurer wrestles with at one point or another. Why can’t we be happy with a settled life, a quiet town, a loving partner, a stable job? What pushes us out the door again and again, away from home and into the punishing reality of a life “out there”? Makes us draw taught the sails, and point the bow towards the irresistible siren song of a distant horizon? What are we hoping to find?

In a word, clarity.

Clarity of mind, and of purpose. For I am never so clear as in those days just before the beginning of some new and dangerous undertaking.

There is a certain noise to civilized life, a clashing and clanging of the grand machine; Of politics, and bills, appointments, and grocery lists. The ruckus of obligation, which grows louder with time. Death alone brings silence from the noise.

Each big adventure is like a very small death. Unlike a vacation, an adventure is filled with risk and contains within it the very real possibility that you may never return. It’s this possibility that allows you to step outside the life you’re currently building, and examine it as though you were about to leave it behind forever. As a trip draws near, the volume on life’s noise goes down each day until soon you’re left with the pleasant hum of nothing but the essentials; The thing’s you’re truly passionate about; The people you want to spend time with; The things you want to say to them.

And then you go. Out to the edges of the map, the places unknown. There you live a different sort of life. It’s difficult, but not in the same way as life back home. You eat less, and sleep less. You’re colder than you want to be, hotter than you think you can bear. You come face to face with your own smallness, and realize that the world truly doesn’t care whether you live or die. And somehow, in the face of that, your own will to live is fanned to a roaring blaze.

The world you left behind no longer seems chaotic and full of noise, but colorful and set to music. Life, you realize, is full of possibilities. It’s there for the taking, and there are no rules except that you must be willing to reap whatever it is that you sow. Your eyes turn once more towards civilized life and the sweet promises of building a place for yourself, shredding endless piles of junk mail, falling in love, and watching TV talent shows.

And so in this way adventure is partly about escaping civilized life so that you can learn to love it once again. It is the winter that strips away all the excess, so that spring can usher in a new bloom. We go, not just because adventure is out there. We go so that we can come back.

How I Wrote a “Bestseller” In A Day (and more importantly, why)

Have you ever had an idea for a product or service that was just so great you knew the world would love it? Were you ever surprised when after weeks of work, and hundreds or even thousands of dollars invested, nobody seemed to want what you were selling?

Most business owners have done this at one point or another. When I was getting started, I did it several times. Our knee-jerk reaction is to dive into developing a product or service based on whether or not we think there’s demand for it. But the better way is to first confirm the demand, then spend money developing the solution.

I’d heard

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7 Days of Calm: What Happened When I Started Meditating Consistently

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Photo Cred: Moyann Brenn

Rather than try and stick to a bunch of resolutions this year, I’ve resolved to try a handful of new habits out for a short period of time, and see if they have any positive effect on my life. I’ve heard somewhere that it takes twenty-one days, or iterations, to makes something a habit, and so this is the number I chose for myself. I thought I’d take one new thing, try it consistently for twenty-one days, regardless of how I felt during that time, then decide whether or not to keep it at the end.

I’ve talked before about this short-term method of planning, and how it not only makes things easier, but also keeps you flexible so that you can take advantage of opportunities that may arise throughout the course of your experiment.

The very first habit I tried to cultivate was journaling. And each night, starting from the new year, I sat down with my notebook to answer two specific questions:

  1. What wins did I have today?
  2. What is one thing I learned?

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A Case for Short Term Goals and Un-Planning

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Today’s December 2nd, which means today marks exactly three months since I put my business on hold, and set off on the Appalachian Trail.

My, how things have changed.

In August, I lived in my parents’ basement in Connecticut. Today, I live in a finished attic on a rural English estate with a walled garden and an indoor pool (and in a week I’ll live somewhere else entirely). Could I have seen any of this coming? Could I have planned it?

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In his interview with Derek Halpern, three-time best-selling author Tim Ferriss says that the key to his shocking success hasn’t been strategic planning, as many might first think. Instead, he lives by a series of three to six month goals and micro experiments. There are at least two major benefits for doing this.

First, he says, it lets him

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